DISNEYLAND AFTER DARK – Dic.Nii.Lan.Daft.Erd.Ark

Album review: DISNEYLAND AFTER DARK – Dic.Nii.Lan.Daft.Erd.Ark

By STEVE MASCORD

MOST of us have lists in our heads of “most under-rated bands”. D:A:D – Disneyland After Dark – are at the very top of mine.

I interviewed the Danes back in 1989 when they visited Australia on a promotional tour for No Fuel Left For The Pilgrims, their big American ‘breakthrough’ album. In fact, the breakthrough was extremely modest, although “Sleeping My Day Away” still gets airplay on specialist stations in the US like Sirius XM’s Hair Nation.

Like a lot of acts who have “escaped” international recognition but flourished in rich local soil – witness Powerfinger, for instance – and these lads’ artistic and creative evolution has not been sullied by the demands of suits from London or LA.. They had enough success to encourage, not enough to ruin. D:A:D craft hard rock songs that are musically almost perfect and lyrics that boast a sardonic wit that should embarrasses those of us who claim English as a first language.

Is there a better summation of this social media-obsessed world than “Winning hearts and turning heads/A simple beast that must be fed” at the start of “Breaking Them Heart By Heart”?
D:A:D are not allowed to call themselves Disneyland After Dark due to the threat of a legal suit by Disneyland itself in the late 1980s so this album title is a cheeky way around that. Dic.Nii.Lan.Daft.Erd.Ark is actually a little less even than its predecessor, Monster Philosophy, and would have perhaps been enhanced by losing a track or two. But when the Binzer brothers (singer Jesper and guitar whiz Jacob), bassist Stig Pederson and drummer Laust Sonne hit the mark, they do so spectacularly.

“A New Age Moving In” opens this platter with impressive bluster, Pederson’s two-string bass to the fore and “I Want What She Got” is a classy, brothel-creeping opening single. It’s the guitar fills that give D;A:D a wide-screen feel, something that few bands today manage aside from perhaps Foo Fighters and Metallica at their dramatic best.

“The End” is reminiscent of their heaviest, most discordant offering, 1995’s Helpyourselfish – but it still has an instantly memorable chorus.

Things go up a notch with the perfect hard rock of “Fast On Wheels”. D:A:D once wrote a song with the diametrically opposite viewpoint: “The Road Below Me”. That was about moving, this is about discovering the charms of stopping. And it’s utterly engaging, with the sort of playing we often associate with “alternative” rock and perfectly executed vocal melodies.

read on

Comments

  1. Thanks for the review Steve, i dont know too many Aussies that even know of this band!!

    • Hi Craig!
      Actually there is a fb site called D-A-D Fans of Australia. Sadly the woman who hosted it died of cancer December 1st 2014. – I am from Denmark and try to keep it a bit up to date . And there are D-A-D Fans – True Believers + you can visit their website http://www.dad.dk 😉

  2. Mick Gabriel says:

    i saw them at st George leagues 89/90 not sure but loved them….”but you carnt run away from trouble cos there ain’t place that far” gold

    • Hi Mick!
      They have a lot of brillant lines like that. – And the song it’s from Jihad is still on the setlist each concert 🙂

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