THE JOY OF SIX: Round 21

The Joy Of SixBy STEVE MASCORD

PILLAGED RAIDERS

DO the mechanisms which give us an even competition also give us even games, or are there completely different influences at work? Melbourne’s 68-4 win over Canberra was the eighth largest margin in premiership history. But the result was not the product of any obvious competitive disparity; Canberra had not lost a game at home all year and went into the match just three competition points behind their eventual pillagers. If you organised a soccer competition from scratch and made every team completely equal in strength, but then doubled the width of the goals, would margins still be bigger, or would we just have higher scores? Referees believe the crackdown on some slowing tactics in the ruck has saved many players from knee and ankle injuries. But it may have also made it easier to run up cricket scores with a smidgeon of momentum.

SENDING THE BILL

FORMER referee Bill Harrigan performed some consultancy work on live radio on Friday. After his side beat Penrith 42-6 at Centrebet Stadium, coach Trent Robinson said Sydney Roosters had been copping it in penalty counts for a best part of a decade. When Robinson was interviewed afterwards, Harrigan – a commentator on Triple M – told him: “I went with Ricky Stuart in 2004 when he was having problems and I identified, after looking at a few tapes, three players who we pulled aside and said ‘you three guys are giving away a certain amount of penalties per game … maybe you need to grab a referee” Robinson replied: “I was keen on asking you. Do you see trends there … or do you think it’s individuals?”. Harrigan said it was down to individuals. Robinson was then told by other commentators jokingly – that he if he wanted more from Harrigan “there will be a fee”.

DRESSED FOR THE NINES

phonto (1)Joy of Six hears that Warrington’s majority shareholder , ‘pop impresario” Simon Moran, wanted the Wolves to take part in the inaugural Auckland Nines but was turned down. Nines has major role to play in the expansion and promotion of rugby league but a tournament involving the 16 NRL clubs in Auckland in Februrary achieves only two things: promotes rugby league in New Zealand and earns the clubs a shedload of cash. Involving international sides, or dividing the teams into states plus the north and south islands on Origin grounds (Ben Barba for Northern Territory, Joel Reddy for SA etc), could have left a lasting legacy. A break for the All Star game won’t really do any harm and it is to be hoped a Polynesian side – perhaps in place of the NRL combination – can be incorporated when it returns in 2015.

TAKING A LEAK

IT’S been a big year for leaks. For a start, leaks have a new poster boy in Warriors front rower Russell Packer. Then there are those upset about the leaking of ASADA documents. North Queensland coach Neil Henry was dismayed members of the media knew about his fate before he did. Reporters know that most people who leak information aren’t like Edward Snowden; they are motivated by self-interest rather than altruism. If it’s someone in authority, that motivation is often that they wt to be seen to be doing something in the face of criticism. The reporter’s job is to sift through the spin and self-interest and draw out the raw information which is in the public interest – not to take sides with someone just because he or she has helped them. In the two examples listed above, the reporters have done their jobs and done them well.

HAILING A MEDICAB

IT can be an unsettling sight when a game is stopped for a long period while an apparently seriously injured player is carted from the field. There were three of them at the weekend. Cronulla centre Ben Pomeroy was knocked out as he hit the ground but not before setting up a try against the Warriors. Melbourne’s Maurice Blair was in a particularly bad way after his neck was hurt in Canberra and Gold Coast under 20s player Tom Rowles was also fitted with a neck brace and carried from Skilled Park on a medicbab on Sunday. Thankfully, Rowles was well enough to watch the rest of the game from the bench while Pomeroy was soon reasonably lucid although his memory of the incident was hazy. The Storm reportedly contacted Blair’s partner on Sunday night to assure her he was not seriously injured.

REPORTING THE REPORT

IS a referee required to tell a player why he has been placed on report? “What was it for?” Gold Coast’s Greg Bird asked Gavin Badger and Allan Shortall at Skilled Park after he was booked in the 56th minute of the 36-6 win over Wests Tigers. “Shoulder charge? High tackle? Late tackle.” “It’s been reviewed, it’s on report,” Badger replied. Despite the scoreline, Wests Tigers coach Michael Potter was also unhappy with the whistlers. “My concern was the actual penalties,” he said. “I looked at the replay and shrugged my shoulders. I didn’t know what they were for. You could certainly come up with some if you look close enough. A couple of the 50-50s … they weren’t penalties. That’s not the reason we lost but it contributed to the possession gain the other team had.”

Filed for: SYDNEY MORNING HERALD

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